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Lucky Moose: How a headline-grabbing plant theft in Toronto changed Canada’s citizen’s arrest laws

When David Chen detained a thief at the Lucky Moose Food Market in Chinatown, the Toronto shopkeeper did not expect to be the one arrested.

In May 2009, Chen performed a citizen’s arrest on a brazen thief who had repeatedly stolen plants (and only plants) from local shops.

To David’s great surprise, he was the one arrested when police arrived — not the shoplifter. David and his colleagues faced serious charges, with a possible penalty of up to two years in jail.

They challenged those charges in court, but that’s not all: Chen and his legal team engaged Parliament to challenge the way the Canada’s citizen’s arrest laws were written.

The results would not only change David Chen’s life, but also Canada’s Criminal Code.

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Lucky Moose: How a headline-grabbing plant theft in Toronto changed Canada’s citizen’s arrest laws | Short Docs
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